2006 Daher Socata TBM 850 HB-KOR

In the early 1980s, the Mooney Airplane Company of Kerrville, Texas, designed a six-seat pressurised light aircraft, powered by a single 360 hp (268 kW) piston engine, which they designated the Mooney 301.  Accordingly, talks soon commenced between Mooney and SOCATA on the subject of producing a turboprop-powered derivative.The product that emerged from these discussions was a new design, referred to as the TBM 700, which was considerably heavier than the original 301 while provisioned with more than twice the available power. The prefix of the designation, TBM, originated from the initials "TB", which stands for Tarbes, the French city in which SOCATA is located, while the "M" stands for Mooney. 

On 14 July 1988, the first TBM 700 prototype conducted the type's maiden flight. Flight testing proved that virtually all of the established goals of the design had been achieved, leading to quick progress towards production. On 31 January 1990, type certification was received from French authorities; it was followed by the awarding of US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification on 28 August 1990. During early 1990, the first delivery of a TBM 700 occurred; the first production batch of 50 aircraft were sold out almost instantly. Early feedback received from operators and pilots was typically positive about the capabilities of the new aircraft, often praising its speed and generous power margins amongst other attributes. The introduction of the TBM 700C2, which increased the maximum takeoff weight from 6,578 to 7,394 lb (2,984 to 3,354 kg), enabled operators to fly with both fully laden fuel tanks and maximum cabin occupancy. The modifications made upon this model included the addition of a baggage compartment aft of the rear pressure bulkhead, the strengthening of the wing and landing gear, and seat crashworthiness certification for up to 20 G to accommodate for an elevated stall speed at higher weights. Around the same time, SOCATA decided to re-design the interior of the aircraft, both in terms of the fittings and finish, along with the adoption of a new integrated environmental control system, to improve passenger comfort levels.

The TBM 850 is the production name for the TBM 700N, an improved version of the aircraft powered by a single Pratt & Whitney PT6A-66D engine, which is flat rated at 850 shp (634 kW). The TBM 850 is limited to 700 shp (522 kW) for takeoff and landing; however, during cruise flight, the engine power can be increased to 850 shp (634 kW); this extra power provides the aircraft with a higher cruising speed than the TBM 700 models, especially at high altitudes (due to the flat-rating). The outside appearance of the TBM 850 has remained similar as that of the standard TBM 700. The TBM 850 has a typical range of 1,520 nautical miles (2,820 km).

 

General characteristics

  • Crew: one or two pilots
  • Capacity: four to six occupants, including pilots
  • Payload: 636 kg (1,403 lb) (max)
  • Length: 10.736 m (35.22 ft)
  • Wingspan: 12.833 m (42.10 ft)
  • Height: 4.355 m (14.29 ft)
  • Wing area: 18 m² (193.75 sq ft[24])
  • Empty weight: 2,097 kg (4,629 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 3,354 kg (7,394 lb)
  • Usable fuel: 291 US gal / 1,100 liters
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-66D Turboprop, 634 kW (850 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 611 km/h (320 knots) FL280
  • Cruise speed: 467 km/h (252 knots) long range cruise at FL310
  • Range: 2,820 km (1,520 nmi) long range cruise at FL310
  • Service ceiling: 9,450 m (31,000 ft)
  • Fuel consumption: 208 l/h (55.0 US gal/h), 164 kg/h at 320 kn (590 km/h) TAS, FL310, normal cruise, 6300 lb (2858 kg)[25]
  • Time-to climb to 31,000 ft.: 18 min 45 s